Publication Date

Summer 2012

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Sociology

Advisor

Peter Chua

Keywords

colorblind, hip-hop, race

Subject Areas

Sociology

Abstract

Does the individual's frequency of listening to hip-hop music have an effect on whether or not they believe in a color-blind ideology? Using data from a 25-item questionnaire given to 165 participants drawn for a sample from an urban California college, this study tested six hypotheses in order to determine if such a connection exists. Results revealed that individuals who frequently listened to misogynistic rap were less likely to believe that race is a convenient way to categorize individuals, controlling for race, sex, and income. Thus, individuals who had a higher frequency of listening to hiphop were less likely to have a color-blind ideology. These results contribute to

theoretical views about notions of race and cultural practices by showing that hip-hop

music listeners, to some extent, take an active role in shaping their views of race.

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