Authors

D. Wunch, California Institute of Technology
G. Toon, California Institute of Technology
P. Wennberg, California Institute of Technology
Steven Wofsy, Harvard UniversityFollow
B. Stephens, National Center for Atmospheric Research
M. Fischer, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories
O. Uchino, National Insitute for Environmental Studies
J. Abshire, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
P. Bernath, University of Waterloo
S. Biraud, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories
J.-F. Blavier, California Institute of Technology
C. Boone, University of Waterloo
K. Bowman, Texas A&M University
E. Browell, NASA Langley Research Center
T. Campos, National Center for Atmospheric Research
B. Connor, BC Consulting Limited
B. Daube, Harvard University
N. Deutscher, University of Wollongong
Minghui Diao, Princeton University
J. Elkins, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
C. Gerbig, Max-Planck-Institut fur Biogeochemie
E. Gottlieb, Harvard University
D. W. Griffith, University of Wollongong
D. Hurst, University of Colorado
R. Jimenez, Harvard University
G. Keppel-Aleks, California Institute of Technology
E. Kort, Harvard University
R. Macatangay, University of Wollongong
T. Machida, National Insitute for Environmental Studies
H. Matsueda, Meteorological Research Institute
F. Moore, University of Colorado
I. Morino, National Insitute for Environmental Studies
S. Park, Harvard University
J. Robinson, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research
C. Roehl, California Institute of Technology
Y. Sawa, Meteorological Research Institute
V. Sherlock, National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research
C. Sweeney, University of Colorado
T. Tanaka, National Insitute for Environmental Studies
M. Zondlo, Princeton University

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

October 2010

Abstract

The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO2, CO, CH4, N2O and H2O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measurements. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made in 2004 and 2006. The results indicate that a single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

Comments

This article, the Version of Record, originally appeared in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques in Volume 3, Issue 5 and can be found at this link.
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