Presentation Title

Creating an Open Access Course Reserves (When an OA Textbook isn't enough)

Location

King Library 255/257

Start Date

23-10-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

23-10-2015 11:00 AM

Description

The search for alternatives to high priced textbooks endures. The librarians at the MGH Institute of Health Professions, with the help of an IMLS Sparks! Ignition grant, decided to jump into the fray by creating the Open Access Course Reserves. It is a publicly available, curated repository that provides ready-made reading lists of free, copyright compliant (open access when possible), educational materials. The materials are selected to match typical syllabi and textbook contents and organized by discipline and course. The goal of the project is to create a place for faculty of any higher education course from anywhere in the world to find course packs to replace traditionally published textbooks and therefore reduce the financial burden on their students. This talk will focus on the highs and lows of the process including faculty enthusiasm as well as reluctance to implement, technical and design difficulties, the fun and frustration of gathering resources, and finally the initial reactions from faculty and students.

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Oct 23rd, 10:30 AM Oct 23rd, 11:00 AM

Creating an Open Access Course Reserves (When an OA Textbook isn't enough)

King Library 255/257

The search for alternatives to high priced textbooks endures. The librarians at the MGH Institute of Health Professions, with the help of an IMLS Sparks! Ignition grant, decided to jump into the fray by creating the Open Access Course Reserves. It is a publicly available, curated repository that provides ready-made reading lists of free, copyright compliant (open access when possible), educational materials. The materials are selected to match typical syllabi and textbook contents and organized by discipline and course. The goal of the project is to create a place for faculty of any higher education course from anywhere in the world to find course packs to replace traditionally published textbooks and therefore reduce the financial burden on their students. This talk will focus on the highs and lows of the process including faculty enthusiasm as well as reluctance to implement, technical and design difficulties, the fun and frustration of gathering resources, and finally the initial reactions from faculty and students.