Publication Date

5-20-1998

Degree Type

Master's Project

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Nursing

First Advisor

Virgil Parsons

Second Advisor

M.J. Henderson

Abstract

Testicular cancer remains the number one cancer for men age 15 through 35. Early detection is essential to decrease morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the extent to which California nurse practitioners screen for testicular cancer and the frequency of teaching testicular self-examination to patients. The study surveyed 425 adult or family nurse practitioners, currently practicing in the state of California, with a patient population that includes males age 15-35. The study supported the previous findings of Sladden and Dickinson (1995). Nurse practitioners do believe that testicular self-examination is an effective screening method to detect testicular cancer. While practitioners believe they should teach the procedure to male patients, teaching inconsistently materializes in clinical practice. Similarly, nurse practitioners believe that their examination of the testes is an effective screening method to detect testicular cancer. While practitioners believe they should screen male patients for testicular cancer, screening inconsistently occurs in clinical practice. Practitioners identified several barriers that account for the discrepancy, the foremost stemming from infrequent, episodic utilization of health care by males in the affected age group.

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