Publication Date

1-22-2018

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Health Services Research

Publication Title

Journal of Participatory Medicine

Abstract

Background:

The patient-centered medical home model intends to improve patient experience and primary care quality. Within an urban safety net setting in Northern California, United States, these desired outcomes are complicated by both the diversity of the patient community and the care continuity implications of a residency program.

Objective:

The objective of our study was to understand the patient experience beyond standardized satisfaction measures.

Methods:

We conducted a qualitative study, interviewing 19 patients from the clinic (English-, Spanish-, or Mien-speaking patients).

Results:

Some themes, such as the desire to feel confident in their doctor, emerged across language groups, pointing to institutional challenges. Other themes, such as distrust in care being provided, were tied distinctly to speaking a language different from one’s provider. Still other themes, such as a sense of powerlessness, were related to cultural differences and to speaking a language (Mien) not spoken by staff.

Conclusions:

Findings illuminate the need to understand cultural behaviors and interactional styles in a diverse patient population to create a high-quality medical home.

Keywords

safety-net providers, urban health services, primary health care, patient-centered care, qualitative research, quality of health care, communication barriers

Comments

This is the Version of Record and can also be read online here.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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