Publication Date

5-1-2020

Document Type

Contribution to a Book

Department

English and Comparative Literature

Disciplines

American Studies | Arts and Humanities | Classics | Comparative Literature | Digital Humanities | English Language and Literature | Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies | Film and Media Studies | History | Philosophy | Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies | Reading and Language | Rhetoric and Composition | Technical and Professional Writing

Publication Title

Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities

Editor

Davis, Gold, Harris, Sayers

DOI

10.17613/55a0-am43

Abstract

This is the published introduction to the born-digital, open-access, peer-reviewed *Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities*. More a rationale and scholarly study of both Digital Pedagogy and DPiH in general, this introduces articulates the uses, theory, rationale about digital pedagogy as it has been shaped in U.S. institutions since the explosion of Digital Humanities in 2009. As a separate field now, Digital Pedagogy is built on the generosity of its practitioners, but saving the *stuff* of teaching and pedagogy is difficult. The introduction historicizes this now-published project, its open peer review process, and its development in the early years (starting in 2010) in addition to offering multiple pathways into using DPiH for both experienced practitioners and anyone curious about how to use the 500+ pedagogical artifacts among the 59 keywords. By defining "digital pedagogy," articulating the 5 key concepts that surfaced with the creation of this project, and discussing potential obstacles about engaging in Digital Pedagogy (including an enumerated step-by-step process for getting started in using Digital Pedagogy strategies), this introduction invites all levels of engagement. In addition, the introduction provides an analysis of the types of content, contributors, and curators as well as early network analysis about the connections among all of the keywords, curators, and the shared pedagogical artifacts. Finally, the authors assess the project's infrastructure, open access, and open peer review publishing process over the 10 years it took to bring this project to fruition, luckily, right at the moment that all higher education institutions were forced to grapple with a sudden move to online learning during March 2020. The concluding sections discuss the shifting role of "published" and "publisher" with this born-digital project and considers the use of new forms of infrastructure for a scholarly work that values pedagogy above all else.

Keywords

digital pedagogy, digital humanities, scholarship of teaching and learning, humanities

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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