Publication Date

Spring 2016

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Mark Van Selst

Keywords

Body Satisfaction, Mindfulness, Mood

Subject Areas

Psychology

Abstract

Research has indicated that body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and eating disorder

interventions have historically targeted clinically diagnosed individuals. These

interventions target specific predicting risk factors such as negative affect and body

dissatisfaction. The current study focused on the relationship between negative affect and

body dissatisfaction for a nonclinical population. The central questions were (i) whether

the posited relationship between negative affect and body dissatisfaction could be

replicated for a nonclinical population and (ii) if interventions that target mood would

also lead to increases in self-perceived body satisfaction. The efficacy of mood

interventions as a means to target body dissatisfaction was investigated. Experiment 1

demonstrated the effectiveness of the negative mood manipulation in decreasing mood

and body satisfaction. In contrast, Experiment 2 demonstrated the effectiveness of the

positive mood manipulation in increasing mood and body satisfaction. Experiment 3

examined the effectiveness of the proposed body dissatisfaction interventions, a positive

mood induction and a body scan mindfulness meditation, in increasing mood and body

satisfaction. Positive affect and body satisfaction significantly increased over time

following the proposed body dissatisfaction interventions and the control manipulation.

Implications of the results and future directions are discussed.

Available for download on Thursday, December 21, 2017

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