Publication Date

Fall 2019

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Megumi . Hosoda

Keywords

Flexible work arrangments, self-control, work-family conflict

Subject Areas

Psychology; Organizational behavior

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between flexible work arrangements and work-to-family conflict. Previous research has not yet examined the possible moderating impact of personal characteristics on this relationship. Therefore, this study also examined self-control as a moderator of the relationship between flexible work arrangements and employees’ experience of work-to-family conflict. A total of 131 participants participated in an on-line survey. Results showed that those who had flexplace and flextime available to them in their organizations tended to experience less work-to-family conflict than those who did not have flexplace and flextime available to them. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between flextime and work-to-family conflict such that those who utilized flextime three or more days a week experienced more work-to-family conflict than those who did not use flextime. However, results showed that self-control did not moderate the relationship between flexplace use and flextime use on work-to-family conflict. These results suggest that the availability of flexible work arrangements might be enough to reduce work-to-family conflict and that self-control may not have an influence on the level of work-to-family conflict among those who used flexible work arrangements. It is suggested that companies should make known to their employees that they have flexible work arrangements available to them, and if companies are to offer employees flextime, it may be beneficial to set limits or guidelines for use.

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